Click here to go to the Lufthansa website
Click here for Lufthansa's website

Lufthansa

Click here to go to the Lufthansa website
Click here for Eurowings's website
Lufthansa are the efficient, business like, top quality, and totally soulless national airline of Germany. It gets its passengers where they want to go with ruthless efficiency, and generally pretty much on time. There is a vast route network covering most of Europe, although requiring a change at either of the two main hubs, Frankfurt of Munich. Add to this top quality food, and great drinks, and its suprising more people don't fly on "Luffy".

Fares have been dramatically slashed in recent years. Alas its all badly let down by appalling inflight entertainment on long-haul economy (Lufthansa are the only airline which orders new 747s, without seatback videos), poor seatback goodies, bad business class lounges, a very tough frequent flyer scheme, and brusing customer service.

In the premium classes, it's important to note that Lufthansa have put their money behind ground services. The First Class or Hon lounges are top notch (and some of the best on any network), however the seats and flight are not that great (there is little privacy, and the meals are so-so), while in business you are given to the feeling that you've only paid a little bit more for, well, a bit better food and a couple of extra inches legroom, while the lounges are just a good place for a free beer on a plastic seat, as opposed to sitting outside on a plastic seat.

In short if you know what you're in for, its great. If not, it can be a bit of a shock.

Lufthansa has a small subsidury, Eurowings, which brings together five small airlines - Lufthansa CityLine, Air Dolomiti, Augsburg, Contact Air, and Eurowings itself. It flies to smaller destinations that Lufthansa may not supply, and also in parallel with some routes Lufthansa itself serves at busier times of day.
Lufthansa A300 at LHR Sept 2003 Lufthansa A300 at London LHR Terminal 2


Lufthansa Fleet and Seats

Lufthansa fly a vast fleet, although some of the planes can be a little old, and business class seating is very variable, depending on whether the aircraft has had a refit.

Lufthansa are adding flat-beds in business. The new "PrivateBed" has a flat surface which reclines to nine degrees, and has a fold-away screen. Initially, the new Business Class will go into service in A340-600 and A330-300s and then retrofitted to 747-400 over the next few years.

Business class seats in the A300 are the same as economy, so picking your flight carefully in order to get aboard a 737, or an A320 (plus variants) is a good idea, but be aware that the plane might have been changed for something different when you arrive at the gate to board and your plans might be scuppered.

Lufthansa Boeing 747-400

Lufthansa First class seating on a 747-400 to HKG Sept 2007 Lufthansa 747-400 First Class seats
Lufthansa have 30 747-400s in the fleet.

First Class is upstairs in the bubble behind the cockpit. There are just 4 rows of 2+2 fully flat sleeper seats. These are actually not as great as you would expect: for First Class there is little privacy, because you are seated right next to someone else. True, there is a privacy screen, but it offers little real distance from your neighbour. These seats really do go fully flat, so you can get a decent nights sleep on them. A perk on flights over 6 hours is that there is a trolley put next to the exit row seats with wine, beer and nibbles. You also get a rose in the flower-vase at your seat on landing.
Lufthansa Business class seating on a 747 Sept 2003 The best seat in the house Business 1A in a 747

Business Class is, unusually for a 747, right in the nose, all the way back to row 15. Seats are in a 2+3+2 formation, but in the nose it tails off to just 2 very lonely middle seats, then just the 2+2 seats right up the pointy end. This is infact the best place to be, because in 1A and 1K you don't have any problem getting out if you are in the window seat, and you have a lot of storage room in the cabinet in front. The crew also start to serve there, and it is very quiet with no traffic passing by. On landing you can even see the runway looming ahead.

The old style upright seats are ok, with plenty of cubby holes to put things in. The headrest slides up, and wings fold out.

Economy Class is in a 3+4+3 formation. Row 24, 32 and 43 are the best, because this is where the doors are, however the wing comes from row 24 to 39, so the view is bad. Seat 43A is generally the best choice.

Lufthansa Airbus A320 (A319/A321)

Lufthansa is a big customer of Airbus, and has a big fleet of the A320 model, which are replacing many of the older A300 and BAE146.
Lufthansa A321 at LHR Jan 2005 Lufthansa A321 pushing back at LHR
The business class seat is identical to the economy seat, both in pitch and in width, however if you are in business (within Europe, not intra-Germany), and sit on the left, the centre seat is blocked off and the seat arms moved across to give a larger seat - accordingly it is well worth asking to sit in A or C in business. Seat pitch is 32 inches. No models have any entertainment system fitted.
Lufthansa A321 seats Jan 2005 A320 economy seats

There are thirty-four A320 which seat 144, with the variable business class seats extending back as far as row 20, although in normal configuration they are only used with the first 3 rows as business class. Row 9 and row 10 are overwing emergency exits - if you ask to sit here, you will get 2 inches more legroom.

The business class seats are in grey leather, but aren't the usual ones with moveable armrests - instead, they have a unique tray table in the middle seat which flips down, and has a drinks indent.
Lufthansa A320 seats Jan 2007 A320 business class seats

There are 25 of the larger A321 which seat 182 and are comfortable and modern. Service can be a bit slow, with only a single isle for service. There are no overwing emergency exits, but there is a proper door at row 11 and row 24, so you can as much legroom as you want if you sit in that row, however you do not get any sort of window. Row 6 also has a blanker at the window, so is to be avoided.

There are 13 of the rather squat A319. This variant is smaller, seatin 126, and has only one overwing ejectable windows - sit here, in row 9, and you'll get 2 inches extra legroom.

Airbus A330

A330 at LHR Dec 2004 A330 at London LHR
Lufthansa Airlines has two A330-200s, and five A330-300s. The A330-200 are the newest planes, and as such have much better seats.

Economy seats are in a 2-4-2 pattern, giving a much wider seat than in the 777, and is ideal if you are flying as a couple, as it means the end of clambering over two people when you want to leave the window seat. Row 32 AC, HK are emergency exit seats, as is (very unusually) row 31 in the middle. Row 21 gets a bulkhead.

Business seats are in a 2-2-2 formation, with 8 rows. Row 1 has a bulkhead. At all cost, avoid seat 9A & 9K as there is no window here.

Lufthansa Airbus A300

These are quite old planes. Lufthansa look after them well, but the 9 in the fleet still seem old, with particularly old style seats and overhead bins. The A300 is often used on the flights from LHR to FRA.

Economy is in a fixed 2+4+2 formation.
Lufthansa A300 at LHR Sept 2003 Lufthansa A300 at LHR with retro-fitted wingtiplets

Business Class is in a fixed 2+3+2 formation, in a totally separate cabin. The seats are the same as economy, but the middle seats have folding armrests, giving more width, and there is a bit more legroom. The cabins provide leather seats in the airline's grey livery with yellow piping, and the words "Lufthansa Business" usually adorn the bulkhead, so that you can remind yourself that you are, indeed, at the front of the plane. Rows 16 and 17 get blankers in the windows, so there is no outside view.

Lufthansa Boeing B737

Lufthansa 737 Emergency exit seats LHR Sept 2004 B737 Emergency exit seats
Business Class seats are in a 2+3 layout, with the A and C seats are made from a normal set of three seats, with the armrests pushed closer together to give lots of seat width. It is recommended going for these seats, but here rows 2 and 3 are the best, as row 1 is the bulkhead row, which gives you nowhere to stow bags containing things you want quick access to.

All planes have had a minimum of three business class rows, but with just a sliding curtain that can move according to demand, and sometimes you'll find your seat moved if the curtain moves, thanks to a sudden influx of people in the cheap seats. On the other hand business class can go all the way back to row 20.
CRJ-200 at LHR Sept 2004 CRJ-200 Lufthansa Cityline at Cologne

Economy is in the usual 3+3 pattern, with row 10 being the emergency exit seat, with a lot more legroom.

Lufthansa CRJ-200

Lufthansa has an amazing 60 of the Canadair Regional Jet 200s. They carry 50 passengers. All seats are in a 2+2 layout. Overhead locker space is very limited - you can take a normal sized carry-on bag, however this is taken off you at the door (remember to ask for a yellow tag at checkin for this process). Regular travellers know to take a smaller squashy bag, which will fit in the overhead bins, however there is not really much of a delay in collecting your bag. There is a full (trolley) drink and food service on these very tiny planes.

Business Class is separated from the rest of the cabin with the usual moveable curtain. There are usually three rows of business class (1 to 3 on the left, two rows of 2 to 3 on the right). There is however no extra legroom.

Economy is in the usual 2+2 pattern, with row 11 being the emergency exit seat, with a lot more legroom. Try and avoid row 20, where the proximity of the engines means you'll have a noisy flight and stagger off the flight with your ears bleeding. The only advantage of this row is that you get served first on flights from Germany.

Eurowings BAE-146

BAE-146 at Dusseldorf Dec 2004 Eurowings BAE-146 at Dusseldorf
Lufthansa's offshoot Eurowings has 26 BAE 146s, carrying 93 passengers. All seats are in a 3+3 layout, and the overhead lockers are normal sized. Most in the fleet are getting decidedly elderly - look at the number of repaints (by the door) to see the age. Although seat pitch is better than most airlines at 31", the width is definitely a bit of a squeeze. The best seats are 1A and 1F, as seats 1B and 1E are never used. In-cabin engine-noise is another failing of the 146, so prepare for your ears to bleed before you land.

Views of the ground are a strong point of the BAE146, because of the high wing above the cabin, so no seats suffer a wing view. Row 5 gives you a lovely view of the engine cowling, but not much else, and row 6 gets a blanker in the window. The overhead lockers in rows 6 to 10 are half size.

It is also worth noting that although beautiful, with great handling characterists, and it can take off from a handkerchief, the BAE146 is not the most reliable of aircraft. The older ones tend to go technical just because there is a little rain in the air.

Eurowings CRJ-200

CRJ-200 at LHR Sept 2004 Eurowings CRJ-200 at LHR
Lufthansa's offshoot Eurowings has 12 Canadair Regional Jet 200s. They carry 50 passengers. All seats are in a 2+2 layout. Overhead locker space is very limited - you can take a normal sized carry-on bag, however this is taken off you at the door (remember to ask for a yellow tag at checkin for this process). Regular travellers know to take a smaller squashy bag, which will fit in the overhead bins.

Business Class is separated from the rest of the cabin with a plastic sheet - not even the usual curtain. Row 1 on the left, and row 2 on the right are the bulkhead seats, and give slightly more room. Business class goes back to row 3.

Economy is in the usual 2+2 pattern, with row 11 being the emergency exit seat, with a lot more legroom.

Lufthansa Inflight experience

Many non-Germans have problems with the attitude of the check in staff and cabin crew. Be warned that vacuous
Coffee at Dusseldorf Dec 2004 Coffee free at the airport stand
smiling Americanese it isn't. Instead you'll get what you paid for, in a very direct way, and woe betide you if you
Lufthansa Business class buffet pod on a 747 Sept 2003 Business The buffet pod in the 747 nose
let the system down. Lufthansa ground staff have been known to shout "Schnel" to get passengers on board quickly, just so the plane doesn't miss its slot. However, you'll get there on time.

The trick is to be polite, but business like. Be firm about what you want, and don't mess around with pleasantries before you ask. Ensure you are absolutely definitely there on time. A few words of German, like please and thank you may also help.

At check-in some airports still operate the Zone system. Here you will be given a zone on checkin. The plane is boarded in zones, and everyone except for First Class passengers have to follow the zone boarding procedure. If you're flying business, and you are in Zone 6, you will still board last, so tough. However at LHR, particularly at the ancient Terminal 2 airbridges, passengers often try to ignore this rule, and sometimes get away with it.
Lufthansa Loos in a 747 Sept 2003 Business spartan loos in a 747-400

At all airports in Germany, Lufthansa have a tea and coffee machine for the use of all passengers - for free. Sometimes it can be a little tucked away, particularly for flights to the UK which have to pass through extra security, but it is a nice perk

At most airports including LHR there is a rack of Newspapers at the gate, with a very good selection even including the Evening Standard, for all classes. FTs on the Frankfurt route go very quickly. Oddly, at most German airports on routes to the UK, you will be offered American papers like the Herald Tribune and USA today, with no English papers.
Newspaper stand at Cologne Nov 2004 Newspapers the airport stand

Trans-Europe in Economy (particularly on the CRJs) on all flights the drinks trolley first goes through business, and then through economy. Note that on flights to Germany, service in economy begins at the front, so on short flights it pays to sit as close to the curtain as possible, which should just about give you enough time to enjoy your G&T before landing. On flights from Germany the reverse is true, and the trolley wizzes through the cabin after the business service, and then trots backwards. Here, it does pay to sit at the back, even in the noisy "bleeder" rear seats of the CRJs.

In Business newspapers are handed out in the cabin for business pretty much soon after takeoff, but the only "English" ones are Time or Newsweek, and a request for a UK newspaper will often turn into the USA Today. Bemusing. About half an hour after takeoff the drinks trolley comes round, half an hour later it appears again, and your food request is taken. Finally an hour and a half in the films start.

On short haul packets of cold sealed towels are handed out. Long haul hot towels are handed out before and after meals.
Lufthansa Business class Menu, TV screen, and drinks 747 Sept 2003 Business Menu, TV screen, and drinks

On Long Haul 747 routes, there is a central buffet pod in business class in the nose of the plane. For the first two hours of the flight magazines are piled here along with beer, 2 reds, and 3 whites. Later in the flight this just turns into bottles of water. The loos in business on these flights are however very disappointing. There is no difference between economy, with no goodies in the loos at all.

In business another perk is that there are postcards in a rack at the front of cabin.
Lufthansa First class seating on a 747-400 to HKG Sept 2007 Lufthansa 747-400 First Class entertainment

Long Haul business class gets a full food Menu, on weird feeling paper. Turn to the middle pages to get the English translation, and the back page for the wine list. Watch out for the items marked Flight Line (sic). These are the lightweight versions for people watching their weight, and which offer miniscule portions.

Lufthansa entertainment - MediaWorld

News: Lufthansa are adding video on demand for all classes. Its called "Media World". Films can be started at any time, interrupted, advanced or rewound. Lufthansa are also offering audio-on-demand, which means you can build up tailored CDs. Business class will get a new screen, at 10.4 inches.
Lufthansa overhead screen in a 747-400 Sept 2003 Business overhead screen in a 747-400

A300 at Copenhagen October 03 Lufthansa A300 at Copenhagen
Lufthansa are considerably behind the times, in that there are no in flight seatback videos for economy long-haul. Instead there are overhead CRT screens in even the newsest 747-400s. However Lufthansa make much of the fact that their business class has individual screens (with a dual English (odd channels) and German (even channels) soundtrack) as well as an overhead projector at the front of the cabin, and first class gains individual DVD players.

Films are listed in the back of the Magazin, in a pretty confusing way. It starts with pages of film reviews. Then there are the listings from and to Germany for 747s with screens only in business, broken down channel by channel. Then there are the listings for the overhead films for economy. Finally, there is a listings for the new screens with video on demand for all classes.

In Business the old style screens are very small, at 4.5 inches, and film selection is a bit limited, but all the films are very up to date. It sometimes takes the crew a long time to switch on the films. On channel 1 on the first half hour of the flight (which is not repeated) there is Euronews. This is recorded at 6am and 2pm each day, so normally isn't too out of date.
Lufthansa headphones Sept 2003 Lufthansa headphones

There are 4 films, all mainstream US imports, a channel with comedies like Friends and Frasier, a documentary channel, and the usual channel with a map.
Lufthansa magazine Sept 2003 Lufthansa Magazin

In all classes there are 16 radio channels.

All classes use the same headphones - small poor quality ones, with an overhead band, and a twin 3.5mm jack plug. Audio quality is dreadful.

Lufthansa Inflight Magazine - Magazin

Lufthansa's magazine is called, in typical business like fashion, Magazin. It's actually a really good read, with lots of travel articles, film reviews and some competitions to win flights.

The first contents page is in German - turn over the page to get the English contents. There's normally a big article with socio-economic analysis of an area, an interview with a European politician, several puzzles, another interview, two travel articles, a page of film gossip, news on new bars and restaurants in travel locations, and miles and miles on Lufthansa news.
Lufthansa magazine Sept 2003 Eurowings Magazin

At the back are details of inflight entertainment.

Lufthansa want to charge €4.50 if you want to take the magazine off the plane. Incredible!

Eurowings Inflight Magazine - Magazin

Lufthansa's small offshoot Eurowings also has it's own inflight magazine - called, similarly, Magazin. It is in all the seatback pockets, along with the Lufthansa version.

It's actually pretty good - but alas, produced just in German, with no English translation, other than the editorial on the front page. There are however some good maps.

Eurowings want to charge €4 if you want take the magazine home with you.

Lufthansa Longhaul amenity kits

The amenity kit in Economy has ben scrapped: you get nothing now, although there are headphones in the seatback pocket.

Lufthansa seatback goodies Sept 2003 Business Class Lufthansa amenity kit
Business gets a large grey bag which looks good, but actually contains less than most airlines offer in economy. There is a bar of Lufthansa branded Milka, a very good pair of socks, a thin and poor eyeshade (branded Lufthansa) a toothbrush with a very small tube of toothpaste, and a sheet of Do not Disturb / Wake me for food stickers.
Lufthansa First Class amenity Kit Sept 2007 First Class Lufthansa Bogner amenity kit

In First Class you get much more in the amenity kit: a Bogner tartan washbag, which contains a small tube of Clarins Moisture Gel, a small packet of a tube of Pearl & Dents toothpaste, and a Pearl & Dents toothbrush, an unbranded comb and shoe-horn, a silk packet with silk eyeshades, earplugs in a blue box, and spare pads for your headphones. It isn't overly luxurious, but it's pretty decent. These washbags fetch quite high prices on Ebay.

Lufthansa Routes

When do you want to fly it? If its in Europe or an old German colony chances are Lufthansa fly there from the hubs of either Frankfurt or Munich.

From London LHR to Frankfurt there are 10 flights a day, Munich gets 7, Hamburg 3, Dusseldorf 4, Cologne 3, Stuttgart 3, and Hannover 3. London City LCY is linked to Frankfurt 3 times a day, however the direct service to Berlin has just been cut.

From Manchester MAN to Frankfurt there are 3 flights a day, but more to Munich - it gets 5. Each day there are 3 to Dusseldorf, and 3 to Hamburg. Birmingham also has 3 direct flights to Frankfurt a day, 4 to Munich, and 3 to Dusseldorf. Frankfurt is also linked to Edinburgh 3 times a day, and Dublin 2 times a day. There is also a small, strange, weekday service from Newcastle to Dusseldorf.
Lufthansa routemap 2003
From the main hub in Frankfurt there are short haul daily flights to Amsterdam (6 times a day), Athens (3 times), Barcelona (5), Bilbao (4), Brussels (10 a day), Budapest (4), Casablanca (1), Florence (4), Geneva (8), Helsinki (4), Istanbul (3), Copenhagen 2 (plus 4 a day, codeshares with SAS), Larnaca (2), Lisbon (3), Madrid 2 (plus 3 others which are codeshares), Milan (7), Malaga (2), Malta (2), Marseille (3), Nice (4), Palma (4), Paris (8), Porto (4), Prague 4 (plus 3 codeshares a day), Rome (6), St Petersburg (3), Stavanger (2), Stockholm 1 (SAS provide 6 other flights), Toulouse (3), Turin (5), Venice (4), Vilnius (2), Warsaw (4), Vienna 5 (Austrian operate 4 codeshares a day) and Zurich (7 times a day).
Lufthansa routemap 2003
Long Haul from Frankfurt there are flights to America, with Atlanta (daily at 1035, 747), Boston (A340s daily at 1035 and 1740), Chicago (daily at 1005 (747) and 1710 (A340)), Dallas (A340 at 0950), Denver (A340 at 1305), Los Angeles (747 daily at 1015 and 1335), New York JFK (A340 at 1035, A340 at 1345, 747 at 1715) and Newark (A340 at 1345), Mexico City (747 daily at 1340), Miami (747 daily at 1010), Philadelphia (daily A340 at 1345), Phoenix (A340 at 1025), San Francisco (daily 747 at 1010), Toronto (747 at 1710), Vancouver (747 at 1320), and Washington DC (Daily A340 at 1035 and 747 at 1310).
A320 at Helsink August 2004 Lufthansa A320 at Helsinki

Long Haul from Frankfurt there is also Bangkok (Daily at 2220 on a 747 which goes on to Maila, plus a 777-200 on a Thursday and Saturday at just 10 minutes later), Bombay (747 daily at 1335), Beijing (daily at 1725 on a 747), Cape Town (747 daily at 2240), Delhi (747 at 1350), HongKong (747 daily at 1740), HoChiMinh City (Monday, Thurs, Sat 747 at 2230), Jakarta (747 daily at 2210) Johannesburg (747 daily at 2240), Osaka (747 at 1355) Seoul (747 at 1755), Shanghai (daily 747 at 1735), Singapore (Daily 747 at 2210) and Tokyo (747 at 1345).
A320 at LJR August 2004 Lufthansa A320 at London LHR

There are also some flights to Abu Dabi (1), Addis Ababa (1), Bangalor (1), Beruit (1), Buenos Aires (1), Cairo (4), Dubai (1), Riyadh (1), SaoPaulo (1) & Tehran (1).

From Dusseldorf there are two flights a day to Barcelona (at 0705 and 1700), 12 a day to Berlin, one a day to Bilbao (at 1105), 3 a day to Birmingham, 2 to Budapest (0715 on Cityline and 1740 on Eurowings), 6 to Dresden, 9 to Frankfurt, 3 to Geneva, 2 to Gothenburg (at 0705 and 1515), 3 to Graz (Tyrolean codeshares), 14 to Hamburg, 2 to Helsinki (at 0840 and 1625), a daily flight to Kattowitz, 9 to Copenhagen, 6 to Leipzig, 3 to Linz (Tyrolean codeshares) 5 to London (the 1355 is operated by Cityline), 2 to Lyon, 2 to Madrid (0950 and 1525), 3 to Manchester (by Eurowings), 17 to Munich (the 1510 is operated by Eurowings), 1 to Newcastle, 5 to Nuremberg (Eurowings) 1 to Oslo (SAS codeshare at 2015), 6 to Paris, 3 to Prague, 1 to Rome, 3 to Salzburg (Tyrolean) 2 to Stockholm (0740 by SAS, 1040 by Cityline), 10 to Stuttgart, 2 to Turin, a Sunday only flight to Venice, 2 to Warsaw, 6 to Vienna, and 6 to Zurich.

From Cologne there are 12 daily flights to Berlin, 16 to Frankfurt, 12 to Hamburg, 4 to Leipzig, 3 to London, 19 to Munich, 2 to Nuremberg, 3 to Paris, and 2 to Vienna (Austrian codeshares).

Lufthansa frequent flyer scheme - Miles&More

Star Alliance Miles&More is Lufthansa's frequent flier programme, and is part of the Star Alliance.

Miles&More, is just like most of the rest in the Star Alliance. You get one mile for each real mile flow, even on the cheapest fares. It is however quite hard to even get onto the bottom rung of the membership ladder - you have to fly a long haul flight, to even be allowed to join.

The status miles you have earned between January 1 and December 31 of any given year add towards the status you get.
CRJ at LHR Jan 2005 Lufthansa CRJ at London LHR

There are four tiers of Miles&More membership. Basic, Frequent Traveller, Senator, and HONCircle. Your Status Level Executive Bonus is a tally of miles flown over the past year which determines your status (to get to Silver or Gold) however it is no longer be given for Star Alliance flights except for United and Lufthansa. You advance up the tier levels as you fly more. Lufthansa are fairly good at upgrading Senator passengers, and even more so for HONs, but only if economy is overbooked. Full details on how to get upgrades are listed in the Hints & Tips section below. As always my advice on how to get an upgrade applies.

Earning Miles&More Miles

Every mile flown counts as a mile for destination and status for the Miles&More scheme, double in Business Class, and treble in First Class.
Lufthansa BAE146 at LHR Sept 2003 Lufthansa BAE146 at LHR

However within Europe, flights now have a fixed benefit, regardless of the length of flight. Most Economy flights (Q class) get 500 miles, while those in classes B & Y (flexible economy) get 750 miles. Class L & T (Restricted Economy) gets 125 miles.

Worldwide you get the miles flown, except for classes B & Y (flexible economy) get which gets 1.5 times the number of miles (minimum 750) while class L & T (Restrited Economy) gets 0.5 times (minimum 125 miles).

There is a 25% mileage bonus for Miles&More members with status of Frequent Flyer (Silver) and Senator (Gold) level.

The Portuguese airline TAP Air Portugal is a new Miles & More partner.

Miles&More Frequent Flyer (Basic)

Once you have flown 3,000 miles, you will receive a regular Lufthansa Miles & More Card.

Miles&More Frequent Traveller (Silver)

Miles&More Frequent Traveller (Silver) Miles&More Senator Card
Silver level can be achieved at 35,000 miles (or 10 Business Class / 20 Economy Class round-trips) in the previous calendar year.

You get access to the Lufthansa Frequent Traveller or Business Lounges all over the world, and check in at the Business Class counter, regardless of class of travel. There is also a 25% mileage bonus.

Miles&More Senator (Gold)

Miles&More Senator Card Miles&More Senator Card
Senator level can be achieved at 100,000 miles (or 30 Business Class / 60 Economy Class round-trips), and is (uniquely) valid for two years. To renew it you then need to fly another 100,000 miles in one of the two years before your card expires.

It is well worth while getting to this level. There is Check-in at a Lufthansa First Class or Star Alliance Gold Counter, regardless of fare paid. Access to the worldwide Lufthansa Senator lounges and Star Alliance Gold lounges with same day Star Alliance ticket. You get an extra 20kg of luggage on all Star Alliance flights (or one more piece on US flights) and an Executive Bonus of 25% on the usual crediting of bonus (and status) miles.
Miles&More Senator Welcome Pack vspace= Miles&More Senator Welcome Pack

On getting to this level you get two free Upgrade eVouchers, which upgrade you to the next level of service, and can also be used accompanying family members and friends. Two vouchers are required for an upgrade on intercontinental flights (or 4 for VIE-KUL-SYD). The perk of extra upgrades at 50,000 miles has been withdrawn.

There is also an opportunity to take along a companion for half the amount of miles on a Lufthansa freebie.

On getting to this level you'll get a nice pack with your new card, a booklet with details of the scheme, and two luggage labels. These are made out of red leather with a silver buckle (and say Lufthansa on one side, and Lufthansa the other) with a plastic slip in card. These act as a priority luggage offload indicator, and means your luggage, should, in theory, come off the conveyor first. This is always a bit of a gamble.

For Senators, if you fly long haul in economy, you will be seated in the first four rows of the economy section, or the exit row and the window seats of the last two rows. These are signed as "preferred" seats, and blocked for status customers, as a "quiet zone". Ths is stricly enforced for pre-reservations, and if you are travelling with non-status passengers, you will be forced to sit elsewhere.

Miles&More Hon Circle (Black)

It may have a terrible name, but HON Circle is the one to go for - it takes 600,000 miles in two calendar years.
Lufthansa First class seating on a 747-400 to HKG Sept 2007 Lufthansa 747-400 First Class seats

The perks are a delight - there is Check-in at a Lufthansa First Class or Star Alliance Gold Counter, regardless of fare paid. Access to the worldwide Lufthansa Senator lounges and Star Alliance Gold lounges with same day Star Alliance ticket. You get an extra 20kg of luggage on all Star Alliance flights (or one more piece on US flights) and an Executive Bonus of 25% on the usual crediting of bonus (and status) miles. Your partner is automatically given a Senator card.

The best bit is you get access to Lufthansa's First Class lounges. A personal assistant will be there for you, to help you with anything you may need from the moment you arrive. They will take care of the check-in and will accompany you through a special security control. They will also handle all the formalities for international flights, leaving you free to enjoy the benefits of the FRA & MUC First Class lounges, which are two of the best in the world, with relaxation zones, bathrooms, restaurants, and a limo to the plane. Note that you don't get this if you are just transiting at these airports, unless you deliberately exit then take a cab to the first class terminal.

Lufthansa Lounges

NEWS: Lufthansa are upgrading their lounge design. Having revamped the Munich lounges with the new Senator Lounge Design, one more lounge is to follow at Frankfurt Airport. The Senator Lounge in Frankfurt in Departure Area A Schengen will have added quiet rooms, armchair landscapes and bistro zones. The conversion and enlargement work in Frankfurt will continue until next year.
CRJ at LHR August 02 Lufthansa CRJ at LHR

There are 2 types of lounge: The Business Lounge (which is now combined with the Frequent Traveller Lounge) and the better quality Senator Lounge.

Lufthansa are one of the few airlines to permit Gold level cardholders access to their top-tier Senator lounges (except at LHR) if travelling economy: most other airlines shuffle them to some second rate lounge.

Business Lounges. Business class passengers (plus FLT Miles&More & silver bmi card holders). Food is normally just nibbles. On check-in at some outstations you must make sure you have an invitation to the Business lounge. The receptionists will often refuse entry if you don't have one, even if you have a business class ticket. It's their way of cutting out passengers who are upgraded.

Senator Lounges First class ticket holders, and Star Gold Card holders, get access to the Senator Lounge. This is by far the best lounge to go for. Food can be good, and there's often a better selection of wine.

Note that at some German airports, such as at Cologne/Bonn, the airport follows the American model, and the lounges are before security. It pays the check before going through to the gate, as you won't be let back to them again.

Lufthansa London LHR Lounges

London LHR business lounge Dec 2004 London Business lounge
LHR Terminal 2 near gate 3 Open 0515-2100
NEWS: Gold Star Alliance members are now banned from the LHR Senator Lounge. This is the only lounge on the network to make such a change.
Both lounges are up two flights of stairs in LHR Terminal 2, closed to the Alitalia lounge and the link bridge to Terminal 1.

As you go in through the door you'll be greeted by two lounge-dragons, who will direct Gold Card members to the Business lounge. The Business lounge is to the right, and the Senator lounge to the left, however when you are past the desk, on the far side by the window there is a door (unlabeled) which has no latch, and which allows you to go from one side of the lounge to the other.

The two staff members on the reception desk are often much better at organising upgrades for Senator level members, than the checkin or gate. It is always worthwhile asking (more details in hints & tips below).
London LHR business lounge Sept 2003 London Business lounge

Heathrow Business Lounge
Business Class, Frequent Traveller Miles&More members, Silver bmi, and Gold Star Alliance members
This is a totally soulless grey room with grey lino, hard grey chairs, hard modernist art on the walls, and grey looking people. It's like being in a bus station cafe, but there is a good view of the gates, and the Terminal 2 apron.

Newspapers are on the rack to the right as you go in, and are a pretty modest selection, with the Daily Mail, Independent, and FT. There is also the USA today and 4 German newspapers.
London LHR Senator lounge bar Sept 2003 London Business lounge bar

Food is decidedly limited, consisting of bowls of nuts, crisps, slices of lemon cake, and digestive biscuits. These are replenished by someone on the other side of the counter - it can be quite disturbing to see a hand suddenly appear and dump a load of nuts infront of you.

Drink is ok, with just one white, one red and 1 bottle of champers. Beer is just Becks, in bottles.
London LHR Senator lounge bar Sept 2003 London Senator lounge bar

Heathrow Senator Lounge
Senator Miles&More members & First Class passengers only
A much better more comfortable lounge than the business lounge, but in a terribly small crowded room. There's the same bad art, but at least there is some carpet, and big squashy armchairs (which, thanks to the overcrowding, are virtually impossible to get) along with some harder buffet style seating by the windows, where there is a good view out of the window onto the apron.
London LHR Senator lounge Sept 2004 London Senator lounge

Often the Lufthansa planes park below the window here, so you can see what you'll be flying on.

There is also a one way door into the business lounge - so it sometimes pays to get food in this side, and then go next door. Newspapers are on the rack in the middle of the lounge, with a decent selection, including the Guardian & FT, plus all the German varieties, and a few magazines, mianly of a US origin, such as "Time" & "Newsweek".
London LHR Senator lounge bar Sept 2003 London Senator lounge wines

There is a TV, with digital terrestrial, however it is often turned off, particularly in the mornings.

Food is better than on the other side, with the usual bowls of nuts, crisps, and pretzels. There are also 3 trays of sandwiches which are actually pretty good, with Cheese, Ham, and Prawn. Occasionally in the afternoon there are cheese wraps which are very good, and highly recommended. If you don't like the sandwiches on offer, as soon as the tray is emptied, a new selection is brought out. There are bowls of olives and gerkins, and packets of wetwipes.
London LHR Senator lounge Sept 2004 London Senator lounge

Drink has better quality wine than the business side, with white being La Bourne & Reisling, while red is Carta Vieja and Cabernet Savignon. Champagne is available if you ask the staff - otherwise there is just sparkling wine. There is plenty of Twinings tea. Beer is Becks, and Bankoff, plus the unusual Jever "Fun" herb beer (which is alcohol free). Alas Lufthansas have stopped stocking Erdinger in bottles (I guess they, and the proper logoed glasses cost to much, and were too tempting a "swipe".

Lufthansa Frankfurt Lounges

The vast hub that is Frankfurt has both types of lounge on Schengen side, on two levels, while on the International side there are two business lounges in the round piers, and a Senator lounge right in the middle of the central pier B. On this level there is also the United Red Carpet club - a bit of a hike, but worth the trip. Gold Star Alliance holders can use this lounge, which is more pleasant than the crowded and stuffy Senator lounges.

At Frankfurt, remote stands are used a lot and this involves a sometimes lengthy bus ride once you're off the plane. Once inside, the Lufthansa terminal in Frankfurt airport is vast and confusing; I recommend asking for a map of the lounges. The lounges can be quite a hike from the gates, and they don't always announce departures, so watch those monitors carefully and give yourself a little extra time to make your boarding.

Note that at Frankfurt you can't get into the first class lounge if you are just transiting the airport, unless you exit Frankfurt immigration, then walk through the airport until you reach Zone A - this may involve walking through a narrow tunnel (like the one at LHR connecting the terminals and the tube). Exit here at street level and walk literally 2-3 minutes to your left. The next building along has the words 'Lufthansa First Class Terminal' on the side, and in you go.
Frankfurt Senator lounge Pier B Sept 2003 Frankfurt Senator lounge Pier B International

Lufthansa Frankfurt Senator Lounge International
Pier B - International (top floor) Open 0530-2230
The main, central, Senator lounge is a bit of a hunt to find at the top of the shopping centre that is pier B. A crowded room many people have reported it as terrible. Its not, but it will never win any prizes as the best lounge in the world either. When the flights to Asia leave, in late evening from 2100 onwards, there is a queue for seats.
Frankfurt Senator lounge Pier B Sept 2003 Frankfurt Senator lounge Pier B

It opened in 1996 and at the time was very smart, but now looks very tired and worn. The chairs, which are the same dark grey as in any Senator lounge anywhere in the world are showing their age and not very comfortable. Its filled with smoke and filthy carpets.

There is a grid of 4 TV screens on the wall, and remote headsets on the glass table. All the screens show different channels (normally BBC World, Eurosport, and 2 German channels) - select the channel on your headset to the one you want.

There are phone booths, no computers, but Wireless LAN technology (WiFi) if you bring a laptop.

Frankfurt Senator lounge Pier B Sept 2003 Frankfurt Senator lounge Pier B
Newspapers are on the rack in the middle of the lounge, an ok selection. Naturally there are all the German papers, plus a full selection of US papers, and sometimes even some Asian papers. There are never any UK papers or magazines.

Food is limited to the odd sandwich, containing cheese or ham on dark German bread.

Drink is ok, with some good wine, with white being Reisling, while red is Cabernet Savignon. Champers is available if you ask but there are no signs telling you this. There is a Becks beer fountain, and two buttons to press - one will give you a German style head, the other a US/UK style non-froth head. There are even decent logoed glasses.

Lufthansa Frankfurt Business Lounge International
BOTH Pier B - International (left and right rotundra) Both Open 0600-2200
There are two Business lounges in the central part of both rotundra in pier B. They are identical, and both reached by the spiral staircase right next to the gates. This actually makes them ideal to use right up until the flights depart, so there is frequently a last minute flurry of people who spend their time in the Red Carpet Club, and then the last 15 minutes in this lounge.

Frankfurt Business lounge Pier B Sept 2003 Frankfurt Business lounge Pier B
There are drinks and nibbles provided, although these are, irritatingly, right next to the smoking zone, making getting your refreshments unpleasant if you don't like cigarette smoke. It has much better amenities than the Senator, like showers, and free Internet. There is also a big sleeping room. Take a circuit of the lounge as you walk in to check out all the facilities - its on a circle, so you can walk all the way round.

Newspapers are on the rack right after the desk. Naturally there are all the German papers, but it only stocks Time or Newsweek as English magazines.

Food is the usual stale biscuits and dried out, seen better days peanuts.

Drink The choice is good with excellent coffee, two types of wine, and, delight, champers is avalible all the time. True, its "Lufthansa Brut", but its good. Really it is.

Lufthansa Frankfurt Schengen side

Lufthansa Frankfurt Business Lounge A
Frankfurt Business lounge Pier A Sept 2003 Frankfurt Business lounge Pier A
Pier A - Schengen (Right hand side) Open 0530-2200
An ok lounge, but it can be difficult to find a seat when flying at peak business times (such as late afternoon Monday - Friday) in one of the slipery light grey armchairs. There are more seats in the "quiet zone"s which aren't as busy. It is expected that you keep quiet in them though, as people may be trying to rest between long-haul flights. Almost all of this lounge seems to be a smoking lounge. There are small boxes with telephones in them. There are 5 sleeping couches at the back of the "wings" of the lounge. A big TV screen on the wall, made out of 4x3 CRTs completes the mix.

NewspapersThe usual selection of German papers, but in deference to the UK flights there is often an FT.

Food is decidedly limited, consisting of bowls of nuts, crisps, and pretzels.

Drink is ok, with just one white, one red but no champers. Beer is just Becks, in bottles.

Lufthansa Frankfurt Senator Lounge A
Pier A - Schengen (Right hand side) Open 0700-2230
Frankfurt Senator lounge Pier A Sept 2003 Frankfurt Senator lounge Pier A

NEWS: Lufthansa are upgrading their lounge design. Having revamped the Munich lounges with the new Senator Lounge Design, one more lounge is to follow at Frankfurt Airport. The Senator Lounge in Frankfurt in Departure Area A Schengen will have added quiet rooms, armchair landscapes and bistro zones. The conversion and enlargement work in Frankfurt will last to October 2004.

Much smaller and more cosier than its neighboring business lounge. There are comfortable leather armchairs in the dark grey livery of Senator class, plus all the usual amenities such as laptop points. Up one end of the room are some departure screens (for European flights only). Behind this is a room with 5 sleeping couches. In the middle of the room is a small TV, with infra-red headsets in a rack to the right of it.
Frankfurt Senator lounge Pier A Sept 2003 Frankfurt Senator lounge Pier A

Up the other end of the room is a bar with 3 small tables for eating.

NewspapersThe usual selection of German papers, plus an ok selection of magazines, such as Time.

Food is ok, with sausages, and ham & cheese slivers.

Drink is good, with 1 white, 1 red, no champers, but a good spirits selection. There are real full sized wine glasses with a Lufthansa logo. There is a Becks beer fountain.

Lufthansa Dusseldorf Lounges

Terminal A - Schengen Side, up spiral stairs opposite transfer centre near gate 76 Open 0515-2115 (Sat to 2000)
News: The new Lufthansa Senator Lounge in Düsseldorf has opened. Size has nearly double to 700 square meters. The new Lounge features a generous bistro-area, comfortable seating with improved privacy, Quite-Room to lay back and relax, W-Lan Technology, seperated desks in the work-area, smoking-room and stylish washrooms with roomy shower-facilities.

Both the Senator and the Business lounge are on the Schengen side. There are no lounges on the non-Schengen side, however the passport guards are so used to passengers nipping to/from the lounge they will just wave you through.

The lounges are at the top of the spiral staircase in the middle of the terminal. The new Senator lounge is directly on the left at the top of the stairs. The Business lounge is behind the curved desk directly over the "bridge".
Dusseldorf biz lounge Sept 2004 Dusseldorf Business lounge

Lufthansa Dusselforf Business Lounge
Dusseldorf biz lounge Jan 2005 Dusseldorf Business lounge

This is a fairly normal Business lounge, in the heart of the new terminal. Vastly better compared to the old lounge in the old terminal before it was destroyed by fire, it is still fairly soulless, with lino and plastic chairs in a glass and steel emporium.

Newspapers are on the rack by the door of the lounge. There are no computers, just a few pods where you can plug in a laptop, and a couple of telephone booths.

Food is pretty constant, with some biscuits, fruit, and gummy bears.

Drink is much the same as on the Senator side, with some good wine, and the Dusseldorf speciality - Hannen Alt beer, served in bottles.
Dusseldorf Senator lounge July 2006 Dusseldorf Senator lounge

Lufthansa Dusselforf Senator Lounge

This is the brand new design of Lufthansa's Sentator lounge, and a large version at that. It is a delight to use, and far better than it's predecessor over the other side of the "bridge". The only real hassle with it is that
Dusseldorf Senator lounge July 2006 Dusseldorf Senator lounge food
there are fairly poor views over the apron, with a corridor between it and outside windows - which are pretty cloudy anyway.

As you go in there is a smoking box on the left, then the eating area - with the best views over the apron - and the bar area on the right which also has a salad bar. There is a TV here (showing DW) and another TV on the other side of the pillar (showing a range of German channels). As you walk in further on the right hand side are the loos (with a great sliding door and very stylish mirrors) plus the shower booths. These are guarded by a matron on a desk, who is on the towel rota.
Dusseldorf Senator lounge Sept 2004 Dusseldorf Senator lounge salad bar
Right by the door to this is the one and only flight information screen. Watch these carefully, as all departure information is made very quickly, just once, and only in German. It can make less regular travellers rather nervous.

There are no computers, however right at the far end of the lounge is a long curved "desk" where you can plug in a laptop.

Newspapers are on the rack in the middle of the lounge, an ok selection. Naturally there are all the German papers, the European FT, plus a full selection of US papers such as USA today and the Herald Tribune. There are never any UK papers or magazines, and if you ask for them you are directed in a bemused fashion towards the US ones.

Food is now very good. The selection varies according to the time of day. There is breakfast until 11am, with crossants, rolls, and some amazingly good jam. Plus there are cornflakes, and genuine German gummy bears to sprinkle over them. At exactly 11am breakfast changes to lunch, with a very good pasta, potato salad, lettuce,
Dusseldorf Senator lounge July 2006 Dusseldorf footy game
tomatos, herb and lard mix (great name!) and ham and cheese crossants. All day there is fruit and biscuits, and in the evening some nice cake slices.

Dusseldorf Senator lounge Sept 2004 Dusseldorf Senator lounge
Drink is ok, with some good wine, with white being Reisling, while red is Cabernet Savignon. Champers is available if you ask but there are no signs telling you this. However, being Dusseldorf, the lounge has the local speciality - Hannen Alt beer, served in bottles.

Down the stairs is a rare Dusseldorf bit of humour - a Lufthansa branded table football game.

Lufthansa Cologne (Koln/Bonn) Lounges

Terminal 1, Pier A Before Security, opposite checkin Open 0500-2200
Very unusually, in this rather old and decrepid airport, the lounges are before security, following the American system. Despite the uprated shops after security, there are no lounges (except for BA's) after this point, and due to the long walks to get to the Lufthansa gates (pier B) and then to pass through the non-Schengen UK side (in the basement of pier B, at gates B81 to B83) you should leave the lounge very early for the flight. It may also be worth leaving early to enjoy that rarest of things - the open air observation patio on the roof, which allows you to see most of the airport's operations.
Cologne Senator lounge Jan 2005 Cologne Senator lounge
Lufthansa Cologne Senator Lounge

Welcome back to the 70s. This lounge is one of Lufthansa's oldest, and despite serving some of the most modern food, in the golbal lounge sphere, it's never going to cut it. Many of it's problems stem from being before security - so many Senators use it, even when flying dba or Germanwings. It therefore gets a lot of traffic, some of which use it roughly.

You enter through the mirrored doors onto the main concourse. The reception desk then faces the large non-smoking seating area, so you are observed throughout your stay - not a nice experience. Much better is to walk up past the food to the smoking area, where there are unobserved seats, but alas on cold hard benches. By the food counter there are also a few dining seats, which are the most popular areas to sit a - although they get a lot of smoke drifting over.
Cologne Senator lounge Jan 2005 Cologne Senator lounge

Food is the usual Lufthansa offering of biscuits (both dark and white chocolate - although after spending a day sitting in the smoke they have the consistency of glue) nuts, gummy bears, rolls, and a couple of types of cream cheese, along with coleslaw and slices of ham. There is also a small pile of fruit.

The Bar has three types of white (although only a sparkling Chardonnay and no Champers) in a bucket of ice, and two of red on the top of the shelf, which are hard to spot. There are six spirits, including Baileys and Famous Grouse. Beer, in bottles, is just Becks. However in the dining part of the food area, there is a beer fountain, serving Koelsch beer with proper glasses. Alas, the rivalry between Cologne and Dusseldorf is such, that there is no alt beer.

There are a reasonable number of German Newspapers on the rack, but no magazines or English papers, just the USA Today the Herald - odd, considering there are no direct flights to the USA from
Cologne biz lounge Jan 2005 Cologne Business lounge
Cologne, but there are 4 flights a day to the UK.

A new innovation at Cologne is a Computer with fast internet access. Alas, it uses Netscape, but it is there for everyone to use in the small business centre with two desks, a fax and copier, and a phone in a booth. There are no loos or showers in the lounge - instead you are invited to use the main facilities in the concourse.

Lufthansa Cologne Business Lounge

The Cologne Business lounge is a pretty typical example, on a level above the Senator lounge, but with a separate entrance, and stairs leading up to it. It is pretty average, with the normal lino and light grey plastic chairs.
Cologne biz lounge Jan 2005 Cologne Business lounge

Newspapers are on the rack by the door of the lounge. There are no computers, just a telephone booths.

Food is pretty constant, with some biscuits, fruit, and gummy bears.

Drink is much the same as on the Senator side, with some good wine, and a Kolsh fountain.
Hamburg HAM Senator lounge July 2005 Hamburg Senator lounge

Hamburg Senator lounge

Terminal 2, Level 2, Schengen area after Security Open 0520-2200
This lounge has just had a revamp - and as such you get much nicer comfy leather seats to kick back in - but that's about it for new frills. Certainly the warm colours and freshness do work, and the atmosphere is more relaxed than before. The smoker's area is in a glass room at the end of the lounge, so the traditional Senator ashtray experience is no longer present. One delight of this lounge is a huge picture window with a view of the airport apron, and a separate access to the observation terrace. It is one of the very few premium lounges in the world to allow you to take your drinks outside, and rest on the rather pleasant wooden patio tables outside.
Hamburg HAM Senator lounge July 2005 Hamburg Senator lounge bar

Food is marginally better than the usual Lufthansa offering, thanks to the "deli fridge". Here there are the usual trays of flavoured lard and cream cheese, plus frankfurters and heavy german bread. There's plenty of fruit too, but no real salad. At the bar there are plenty of biscuits, nuts, and gummy bears.

The Bar has three types of white (although only a sparkling Chardonnay and no Champers) in a tray of ice, and two bottles of red next to the tray. There are six spirits, including Baileys and Famous Grouse. Beer is very good here, with Franziskaner & Erdinger in bottles, and Becks on draft.
Hamburg HAM Senator lounge July 2005 Hamburg Senator lounge deli

There are a reasonable number of German Newspapers on the rack, but no magazines or English papers, just the FT, USA Today and the International Herald. There is a small business centre with a fax and copier, and a phone in a booth, but no computers. There are no loos or showers in the lounge - instead there are communal ones in the corridor outside.

Lufthansa Munich Lounges

Terminal 2 After Security
The Munich is much less of a hub than Frankfurt, however it does have a lot of flights to many parts of the world. As a result it has two floors (Schengen, and non-Schengen) both of which have both types of lounge.

At Munich, changing planes can involve a long walk, but at least the layout of the airport is pretty simple - however to find the lounges I recommend asking for a map of their locations.. The lounges can be quite a hike from the gates, and they don't always announce departures, so watch those monitors carefully and give yourself a little extra time to make your boarding.
Munich Senator Schengen lounge Jan 2005 Munich Senator Schengen lounge

Lufthansa Munich Senator Schengen Lounge
Terminal 2, Level G, Opposite gate G28 Open 0515-2130
This lounge is the main First Class (plus Senator) lounge for Lufthansa at Munich. As a result it is always clean, tidy, with the best atmosphere - and a great paddling pool in the middle of the lounge. Not that it is designed for paddling, but the water feature does look very good.
Munich Senator Schengen lounge Jan 2005 Munich Senator Schengen lounge

As you walk in, you notice that the entire lounge is built around curves. You curve around the initial set of leather armchairs. On the far wall are the TV screens showing departures. Then you hit the dining area, with a curious migration from the Frequent Flier lounge - light grey chairs. On the left is the buffet, and on the right are a load more comfy armchairs.
Munich Senator Schengen lounge Jan 2005 Munich Senator Schengen lounge

Food has a pretty good buffet, with burgers and hanks of pork, along with trays of coleslaw and salad. The bread basket is particularly good, and the Gerkins are some of the best in Lufthansa lounges around the world.
Munich Senator Schengen lounge Jan 2005 Munich Senator Schengen lounge

Beer of course, is the Bavarian party juice, and in this lounge there is something special - the beer pumps are manned, and you even get beer served at your seat. There is Lowenbraw and Fransikamer (white) beer on draft, in logoed glasses. Wine is however quite poor, and just comes in with three whites in a bucket of ice. There is no Champers, just sparkling Chardonnay.

There are a reasonable number of German Newspapers on the rack, by the door, but no English papers, just the USA Today the US Herald. There is a small business centre with 4 seats, a fax and copier, but no computers. There are two phone booths. There is an extensive sleeping area, and showers.
Munich Senator Schengen lounge Jan 2005 Munich Senator Non-Schengen lounge

Lufthansa Munich Senator Non-Schengen Lounge
Terminal 2, Level H, Opposite gate H23 Open 0515-2045 (Friday 2230)
Munich Senator Schengen lounge Jan 2005 Munich Senator Non-Schengen lounge
Upstairs from the Schengen lounge, is the non-Schengen international area (all UK flights land in this area). It is marginally smaller, and lacks the water feature, but is still very clinical, with not very particular chairs. There is however, as benefits the international flights, a large sleeping area, with 4 very comfy beds, facing a small clock.

Food is almost as good as the downstairs lounge, and has the same good buffet, but without burgers or any meat. The bread basket one of the best of any Lufthansa lounge.
Munich Senator Schengen lounge Jan 2005 Munich Senator Non-Schengen lounge

Munich Senator Schengen lounge Jan 2005 Munich Senator Non-Schengen lounge
Beer is provided by two taps, one with Lowenbrau and the other Fransikamer (white beer). Unlike downstairs, you have to pour it yourself. There are three types of sparking wine in a bucket, and two more whites in the fridge, with a couple of reds hidden above the buffet. There is a fine collection of spirits above the coffee machine.

The usual collection of German Newspapers is on the rack, by the door, but just USA papers. There is a small business centre with 2 seats, a fax and copier, but no computers. There are two phone boxes hidden behind the work booths.

Lufthansa Munich First Lounge
Following its successful introduction at Frankfurt, Lufthansa has replicated its first class lounge concept at Munich, but this time within the actual terminal building complex rather than a dedicated structure. There is access via level 4 (EU departures) and level 5 (non-EU departures). The lounge is in a self-contained building off the access road to the main terminal complex. There are exclusive passport and security checkpoints, with an agent who personally deals with passenger paperwork and calls them when the flight is ready for boarding.

There are no announcements and the information screens only show flights being taken by customers in the area. When boarding begins, they are driven from the lounge to the gate, or apron position, by private BMW or Mercedes cars. There are separate lounge and office areas, rooms with daybeds to rest and a bathroom area including showers and Jacuzzi.

There is a bar and large dining area where the gourmet menu changes three times a day to suit the time and requirement. Typically a sushi selection is provided, as is regional organic produce and an international selection.
Zurich Senator lounge July 2006 Zurich Senator lounge

Lufthansa Zurich Lounges

Terminal B, by gate G1 After Security Open 0600-2030
There are two lounges at Zurich, both of which are in the B pier. Both are very good, but as of the autumn of 2006 you also get access to the Swiss lounges in A pier (now that Swiss is a Star Alliance member). Connecting passengers to Singapore Airlines can also get access to the Bellevue lounge in E pier, via the 5 minute train connection after security.

Both lounges are about a 5 minute hike from the A terminal where Swiss has its lounge - and separated from another line of security for those going to the UK.
Zurich Senator lounge July 2006 Zurich Senator lounge window

There are no bathrooms in the lounge - they are outside, which means showing your boarding pass to get back in. There is a shower room located a short way from the lounge. The only flight information display is in the Lobby.

Lufthansa Zurich Senator Lounge
Zurich Senator lounge July 2006 Zurich Senator lounge bar
This is on the left side of the dragons on the gate. It has been updated with the new Lufthansa interior, and is very nice, but it is often crowded and it is hard to find a seat (there are only 8 with a view of the airport). If so, it can be worthwhile taking your champers to the cheaper seats next door. There is great view of the apron, until the early afternoon when the blinds decend and the window is obscured.

Food is very good, with soup, sausages, finger rolls, cakes, yoghurt, fruits, nuts and of course gummi bears and swiss choccolate. The sandwiches are especially nice, with very good cheese and chicken ones in the afternoon.

Zurich Business lounge July 2006 Zurich Business lounge
The bar is very extensive and includes champagne, two whites and red, along with a very nice spirit and liquers sections. The beer is however poor.
Zurich Business lounge July 2006 Zurich Business lounge

The international newspapers selections are very poor - there are only USA newspapers, with none for the UK. The magazines are mostly German. There are no computers or workstations.

Lufthansa Zurich Business Lounge
This is on the right hand side, and is vastly better than the Senator side, and rates as one of my favourite Star Alliance lounges. It is well thought out with a lovely atmosphere. It is about 3 times the size of the left hand side, and had a much better view of the airfield.
Zurich Business lounge July 2006 Zurich Business lounge

Food is much pooer than on the other side - really not worth bothering with, with just some fruit, nuts and gummi bears.

The bar is also poorer, with just a cheaper sparkling wine and a few spirits.

At the back there are seven desks, with 2 computers, which have an inernet connection - albeit a very slow one.

Lufthansa Berlin Tegel Lounges

Main Terminal, by First checkin Before Security Open 0600-2030
As befits the new capital, there are two lounges at Berlin, both above the main shopping isle of the airport
Berlin Senator lounge Aug 2006 Berlin Tegel Senator lounge
terminal. The terminal itself is a 1960s concrete classic, in a large circle - with checkin desk beside each gate for the aircraft. Make sure you go to the lounge before security, and only head to the gate as your aircraft is called: after security there are no facilites.

To get to this lounge, head up the concrete spiral stairs above the flower stall. The desk for business is straight ahead, and for Senators on the right.

Lufthansa Berlin Tegel Senator Lounge
Berlin Senator lounge Aug 2006 Berlin Senator lounge footygame
This is a big lounge, with a pleasant view of the car park on one side, and the shopping hall on the other. It hasn't been revamped yet, but does have the new food offerings. As you go in there is a table football game, then racks of squashy armchairs. Around the back of the central pillar there is a big wide-screen TV with satelite access. Around the back are the loos - there are no showers. But then again, as long-haul (or even a direct connection to LHR!) has been axed, it doesn't really need them.
Berlin Senator lounge Aug 2006 Berlin Senator lounge

There is just one self-service bar. It has the usual soft drinks, beer on draft, and two white wines in the fridge, and two reds on the counter top. There are also two of the standard Lufthansa sparking wines - a Chardonnay and a Cava. If you ask, you can get excellent Piper Heidsieck by grabbing one of the waitresses as they wander past and putting in a request.
Berlin Senator lounge Aug 2006 Berlin Senator lounge bar

There is a food fridge which has the usual lard & herb creation, bratwurst, and salad. There is hot soup and rolls. On the bar top are gerkins and olives. All day there are gummi bears, crossants, and some really remarkably good cheesecake on the opposite worktop.

There are the standard newspaper racks with all of the German daily papers plus a selection of the Berlin locals, however there are no English newspapers, or any magazines. There is a small business centre which has a couple of computers in works pods with slow internet access, and WLAN. Right up the far end of the lounge is a smoking section - open to the rest of the lounge - and a bizare, lonely, shoe cleaning machine.

Lufthansa Berlin Tegel Business Lounge
This is tired and worn Business lounge, in dire need of a makeover. It does however have a perk denied the Senator side - you can look out and see the planes.

Madrid - Spanair Business Lounge

Straight ahead security, before non-Schengen area. Open 0630-2015
Access is given for Senator and Star Alliance gold members, plus business passengers. No guests are allowed in the lounge, regardless of your Miles&More Status.

Spanair Business Lounge in Madrid April 2005 Madrid Lufthansa/Spanair lounge
At Madrid Lufthansa use the Spanair lounge, which has it's advantages (it's a small, obscure airline, so not many Business passengers) and disadvantages (no access for guess, and poor food). Infact the access policy can sometimes seem a little odd, where you are waved through on some occasions, and get a grilling about your Lufthansas card on others. When the bmi, Austrian, Argentina, and Lufthansa flights are all about to take off, it can get a little crowded.

You enter through the sliding doors straight after security - and even better the lounge itself is in the Schengen area, you can get straight to the gate for flights to Germany. There are two main areas to the lounge; "on top", where there is a TV and computer area, and downstairs, where there is an OK view of a couple of gates, but not of the main apron.
Lufthansa/Spanair Business Lounge in Madrid April 2005 Bar Lufthansa/Spanair lounge at Madrid

There are two bars, one in the corridor behind the reception desk, and one big long one downstairs, with two big fridges. Beer is strictly Heiniken, plus the usual miniture cans of soft drinks, and the strange Spanish "Bucklers Sin". There is no Bloody Mary mix, just a jug of Tomato juice, and one of orange. On top, above the coffee machine (if using this, note there are only small cups - so forget getting a Capochino), there are the spirits, with Bacardi, Baileys, Finlanda vodka, a bland whiskey, and a gin. Also on this shelf are two bottles of red. In the fridge are two bottles of white wine, and (only in the fridge by the window) a bottle of sparkling Cava.

Food is very poor in this lounge. There are some olives and apples in a bowl on the shelf opposite the bar by reception, a few pastries, some biscuits, and that's about it. It is one of the few lounges where you can see people bringing in MacDonalds bags.
Lufthansa/Spanair Business Lounge in Madrid April 2005 Upstairs Seats Lufthansa/Spanair lounge at Madrid

Newspapers are by contrast very good, with all the German papers. There are all the Spanish dailys, the European FT, the UK Guardian and the UK Times. There are some American papers like USA Today, and the International Herald.

There is all of one Computer, which has Internet access, but is appalingly slow. The lounge does however have WiFi access, and there are desks (at the far end of "on top") with spaces for 4 computers. There is also a TV and a HiFi (with stern notices about not disturbing other users of the lounge).

Lisbon - Tap Business Lounge

After security, up escalator, in far left corner. Open 0630-2200
Lufthansa doesn't have it's own lounge at Lisbonm instead it uses the TAP Air Portugal lounge. Access is given for Senator and Star Alliance gold members, plus business class passengers.

Lufthansa/TAP Business Lounge in Lisbon Feb 2007 Lisbon Lufthansa/Tap lounge
This small lounge is actually at the heart of the TAP Air Portgual route network, and so it can get pretty busy at times, and finding a seat can present problems.

It's square, with small glass partitions at the far end boxing in a sleeping area.
Lufthansa/TAP Business Lounge in Lisbon Feb 2007 Lisbon Lufthansa/Tap lounge bar

The Bar is in the far left corner, and it's very good. There are a dozen or so bottles of sprits on the top glass shelf, and three bottles of port next to them. To the right of this there are two fridges, one of which is just rammed with cans of coke, and the other has cans of beer, and three types of white wine, plus Cava (but no champagne) on the bottom shelf.
Lufthansa/TAP Business Lounge in Lisbon Feb 2007 Lisbon Lufthansa/Tap lounge

Food is equally snazy, with lots of canapes on trays on the bar top, and some sandwiches, plus lots of bags of nuts and rasins.

There are two computers in the lounge, but they are woefully slow, and trying to get any work done - let alone read your Emails - is very much a challenge. A quick reboot before starting to use them can solve some of the problems.

There is a good newspaper rack, with all the main Lisbon papers, plus some English language ones like the FT. There is also a magazine rack, with piles of mags like GQ and Mens Health (but only in Portugese.

Lufthansa hints and tips

Cheap Seats

On inter-European routes, Lufthansa review their loadings exactly three weeks before the flight. If all the cheap seats have been sold out by this point, then Lufthansa will release some more.

Changing non-changeable seats

Lufthansa's restricted economy seats are just that. Normally you cannot make any changes to very cheap economy fares (in booking classes L&T). However if you book true (non-codeshare) Lufthansa flights to Germany from the UK via Expedia.co.uk they are often booked into Q class. Despite all the warnings on the Expedia site that the flight cannot be changed, the timings & date of the return portion can be changed (after taking the outbound portion) by calling the normal Lufthansa ticket line and paying £35. A neat trick with this is to change onto a flight with only one Q class economy seat left - meaning that if you have Miles&More status, there is a chance of an upgrade.

Operational Upgrades

Lufthansa are very good at upgrading passengers on busy flights.
Checkin at LHR Dec 04 Checkin at LHR
It's always worth while asking, particularly if you are silver or gold level on a Star Alliance frequent flyer scheme.

Operational Op-Ups happen more often on Lufthansa than on some other European Airlines. Here, LH will upgrade you to business class if economy is full. If you want to increase your chances, plan in advance, and book on the fullest possible routes (Friday & Sunday evening and Monday mornings are good, as are Eurowings flights and those operated by a 50 seat CRJ).

Lufthansa at home bases is very unusual compared to most other airlines in that on very busy flights checkin will decide their upgrade list in advance, and if moving up passengers from economy to business will move up all Senators before the flight opens - and regardless of the time you checkin, or even if you use a self checkin machine, you will automatically be moved up to business (and to full revenue earning 'C' class).

At remote outstations a different system applies, where it is left up to the gate (or sometimes at LHR, the lounge, who will call down to the gate) to make last minute moves through the curtain. Here, Gold Star Alliance members are treated almost as well as Miles&More Senators, but it is down to either the checkin or the gate agent to size you up and see you are suitable for an upgrade from the few people they need to move. At these location if there are just one or two passengers in it, you'll have to hang around the gate, and look keen. Gate staff are often pretty woeful at noticing Star Alliance passengers with status, and it is frequently incorrectly recorded on your booking (your PNR) and then marked as a non-status level on your boarding card. If you are Gold, always check to see if your boarding card is marked *G, and get staff to correct it - you won't get upgraded unless they do.

For passengers without Lufthansa or Star Alliance status, if the flight is very full and it is obvious that someone will be left behing it may help if you make it clear you'll be happy to accept a place on the Vol-Off list (to be offloaded voluntarily) if you get cash and an upgrade on the next flight.
Lufthansa A320 at FRA Sept 2003 Lufthansa A320 at Frankfurt

A very useful trick when trying for an operational upgrade is to look at the main Lufthansa website, and try to book flights - it will say if a particular in/out combination is Sold Out. Often you can book yourself onto this flight via consolidation agents like Expedia, despite economy being full. With luck, you may find you are moved up to Business.

Note that at LHR a lot of Senator Miles&More passengers travel economy, but checkin at LHR's First Class Checkin. The staff here are very bored with Senators asking for upgrades, so tend to ignore requests. You can have better luck if you checkin at the business, or even economy, desks.

However if you can find something to complain about, do, and then ask if you can get on the "on-availability upgrade" list. Then make sure you're on the emptiest possible flight - if there's a spare seat in the front of the plane, you'll get it.
737 at LHR Dec 03 Lufthansa 737 at LHR
Often customer relations will promise to put you on this list, but the check-in staff are so busy they won't notice. Make sure you point it out to them.

As always, my advice on dressing properly in how to get an upgrade applies.

Lufthansa website

The website is the same as all other parts of Lufthansa; clean, efficient, with all the information you need to know - and precious little extra detail.

The booking process isn't the best - as it tries to think for you, often with annoying results. On the main booking page the "Flexibility" option doesn't refer to how flexible you want your ticket - oh no, it simply means how willing you are to take different days. If you select this you'll go through a different page where it'll show you a grid of departure and return dates with the prices. Yellow squares are the cheapest fares.

Next up - or if you select no flexibility - you get two pannels with outbound and return possibles, and with two fare option on the top. Select one flight and it's return companion at the same price comes up highlighted yellow. But woe betide you if you want to select a flight with a non-matching return. The system just won't let you. Ever. It will drive you mad.

Main website: www.lufthansa.co.uk

Note that all reviews and opinions on Lufthansa (LQ) food, service, seats, planes, upgrades, Emirates lounges, Senator Lounges, and the Miles & More Frequent Flyer scheme is soley at my judgement. No legal liability is accepted if you take my advice.

free hit counter